About the course

I will show you how to create a two and three-colour linocut print at home, using the multi-block technique.

Learn how to:

Create a multi-colour linocut print using the multi-block technique.    

  • Plan a design for multi-block printing.
  • Make a registration device or jig.
  • Accurately register each lino block so that each colour lines up in a print.
  • Print your design by hand, using water-based or oil-based inks.  
  • Create a linocut print that you can print as an edition

The course includes:

  • Online self-paced learning.

  • Step-by-step guides and instructional videos.

  • Demonstrations of two multi-block print designs from start to finish.

  • Tools and equipment advice as downloadable PDFs.

  • Hints and tips.

  • Creative community and support.


I will explain the process through two examples, one design that is easier to register (line up the lino blocks for printing) and one that is more complex, which is usually how I make my prints.

 

The designs are carved into traditional grey artists lino, as accurate registration is easier. Soft cut or easy carve lino can also be used.

 

The demonstrations show one design being printed using water-based inks and the other using oil-based inks. This is purely so that you can see the difference.


This course is aimed at people who have already learnt how to carve and print a one-colour print and would like to develop their skills further.

 

Being a self-taught linocut artist, I understand many of the problems and challenges you may encounter. I want to help you by sharing my skills and the things that I’ve learnt. The multi-block technique is the method I now use to make all my multi-colour linocut prints. 

Watch Intro Video

Course Trailer

About your teacher

Linocut artist

Michelle Hughes

I’m Michelle Hughes, a professional linocut artist and designer in York, UK. Trained in fashion design, I worked in the design industry as a surface pattern, giftware, homeware and clothing designer, developing ranges for high-street retailers for 25 years. In 2016, I set up my own business, to create my own range of linocut prints. My inspiration is taken from British landscapes and nature around the UK. I sell my original linocut prints through my online shop, art galleries and events. I teach linocut workshops in my York garden studio. To date, I have taught nearly 40 in-person workshops to over 150 students. I started out on a shoestring, spending about £20 on beginner’s lino cutting equipment. Things snowballed from there!

Course curriculum

  • 1

    Lesson 1 - Welcome to the course!

    • Welcome and lesson plan

    • Welcome to this course

    • Tools and Materials

    • Tools and materials

    • Studio tour Michelle Hughes 2021

  • 2

    Lesson 2 - The multi-block technique

    • The multi-block technique

  • 3

    Lesson 3 - Planning a multi-block linocut print

    • Planning a multi-block linocut print

    • Planning a multi-block print from a design drawing

  • 4

    Lesson 4 - Registration techniques

    • Registration techniques and making a registration device

    • Making a registration device

  • 5

    Lesson 5 - Preparing and carving lino blocks for a multi-block print

    • Preparing and carving lino blocks

    • Preparing lino blocks

    • How to check registration

    • Design A block 1 and 2 - Carving lino blocks guide

    • Design A block 1 - Carving lino blocks demo

    • Design A - Transfer block 1 to block 2 with pencil

    • Design A block 2 - Carving lino blocks demo

    • Design E block 1 2 3 - Carving lino blocks guide

    • Design E - Transfer block 1 to blocks 2 and 3 with ink

    • Design E - Transfer block 2 to block 3 with ink

  • 6

    Lesson 6 - Printing a multi-block print

    • Printing a multi-block print

    • Making a mask

    • Design A colour 1 and 2 - Printing guide

    • Design A colour 1 - Printing demo

    • Design A colour 2 - Printing demo

    • Design E colour 1 2 3 - Printing guide

    • Design E colour 1 - Printing demo

    • Design E colour 2 - Printing demo

    • Design E colour 3 - Printing demo

  • 7

    Lesson 7 - Resources and support

    • Resources and support

    • Resources and support

    • Printmaking terms

    • Linocut print examples

Pricing

Course reviews

5 star rating

Great for the visual learner

Shirley Stone

I wanted to learn how to do more than one colour and because I like Michelle's style of work I wanted to learn the process on how to print in that kind of st...

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I wanted to learn how to do more than one colour and because I like Michelle's style of work I wanted to learn the process on how to print in that kind of style. I'm a visual learner and found the course easy to follow at my own pace at home and a good way to learn. If you do a day course you end up with lots of bits of paper, so the good thing about seeing it on screen means you can refer back to it. The course has lots of photos and written words to refer to what to do as well as videos. Before starting on my first design I spent three evenings reading through the content of the course and as I become more confident I can give the harder designs a go. Shirley K

Read Less

FAQ

  • Is this course suitable for complete beginners?

    No. This course is aimed at people who have already learnt how to carve and print a one- colour print and would like to develop their skills further. For detailed instructions on carving lino and printing lino for beginners please see my Beginner’s Guide to Linocut Printing course.

  • What specific tools and materials do I need to do the course?

    I have shown the process of two designs from start to finish using traditional artist lino and professional Pfeil linocut tools. Linocut tools, traditional artist’s lino, water-based or oil-based printing inks, ink roller or brayer, printing paper, wooden spoon or brayer. Optional but recommended: Ternes Burton pins and stripping tabs and black water-based printing ink for transferring your design. Full details in my course notes or read an overview in my blog: https://www.michellehughesdesign.com/post/2018/07/02/lino-cutting-equipment

  • What other materials do I need to do the course?

    General art supplies: Pencils, coloured pencils, pens, rubber, set square, steel rule, craft knife, cutting mat, inexpensive photocopy paper or newsprint, tracing paper, greyboad or thick cardboard, double-sided tape, masking tape, strong duct tape. Other useful things: Glass to roll ink onto.

  • Can I use beginner’s tools and soft cut or easy carve lino?

    Yes. The same process to make a multi-block print can be used with beginners tools and soft cut or easy carve lino.

  • Is there any online support if I have any questions?

    Yes. My Facebook group is a closed group that is open to anyone who has been on my courses or workshops. You can also email me directly and I will endeavour to answer any questions once a week.

  • When does the course start and how long do I have access to it?

    The course is self-paced. You will now have full access to this course for one year, so that you can study at your own pace at home.

  • How long does the course take?

    I recommend setting aside two to three days for understanding the process and putting a simple design into practice. It will depend on the complexity of design you choose to make, the speed you work and drying time between each printed colour. With my online course you can revisit each lesson as many times as you like.

  • Do I need internet access for the course?

    Yes. The videos are all available to stream. The PDFs are available to view on screen.

  • Where can I see examples of previous student’s work?

    See images and read blogs from my linocut printing workshops at: https://www.michellehughesdesign.com/blog/categories/linocut-workshops